World's fastest shark that can top speeds of 45mph is spotted swimming near Barcelona

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World's fastest shark that can hit speeds of 45mph is spotted swimming of Barcelona in first Mediterranean sighting in 10 years

  • A shortfin mako shark was spotted swimming near Barcelona 
  • The recent sighting was reported off the Garraf coast by an expedition team
  • The shark, which is the fastest in the world, measured about eight feet long
  • This is the first time in 10 years this species has been seen in the Mediterranean

By Stacy Liberatore For Dailymail.com

Published: 17:04 BST, 13 July 2022 | Updated: 19:26 BST, 13 July 2022

An underwater photographer recently captured footage of the world’s fastest shark lurking in waters around Barcelona’s shoreline.

The shortfin mako shark can reach speeds of 45 miles per hour and is currently listed as endangered – this is the first time it has been seen in the Mediterranean in more than 10 years.

The apex-predator are targets of industrial fishing, bycatches, victims of international fin trade and highly sought after in the Asian market.

The recent sighting was reported off the Garraf coast by an expedition team who said the shark swam ‘calmly’ in the open water and measured about eight feet long.

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An underwater photographer recently captured footage of the world’s fastest shark lurking in waters around Barcelona’s shoreline

Underwater photographer David Jara, who captured the images alongside Carlos Molina, told El Pais: "We saw a large black shadow in motion.

‘We were a bit confused. But suddenly we saw something protruding from the sea.

‘At first we thought it was a sunfish, but soon we noticed a dorsal fin.

‘Then we approached, stopped at a safe distance and he also approached the boat. It was impressive.’

The recent sighting was reported off the Garraf coast by an expedition team who said the shark swam ‘calmly’ in the open water and measured about eight feet long. Pictured is its fin poke out of the water

This is the first time it has been seen in the Mediterranean in more than 10 years

Jara also told El Pais that he wanted to dive into the water to get close up footage of the shark, but eventually realized it ‘wasn’t the right thing to do.’

He also said it wasn’t until a further analysis of the footage did he and the team determine it was an endangered shortfin mako shark.

Barría, a marine biologist for Catsharks at the Institute of Marine Sciences in Barcelona and the Higher Council for Scientific Research (CSIC), said the sighting is a good sign for the Mediterranean ecosystem.

The shortfin mako shark is a sleek spindle shaped shark with a long conical snout and a mouth fill of long, slender teeth.

Their range is wide, as they can be found along the east coast, the Gulf of Mexico, Caribbean Sea and now back in the Mediterranean – all tropical and temperate offshore waters.

There is a shortfin and longfin species, depending on whether its open or shallow water, and the one recently spotted was a shortfin.

The shortfin mako shark is a sleek spindle shaped shark with a long conical snout and a mouth fill of long, slender teeth

Adults, prized for their fighting qualities and repeated leaps out of the water, can be 14.8 feet in length and exceed 1,100 pounds in weight.

They prey on fishes such as herring, mackerel, and swordfish and small cetaceans.

Although this shark is endangered, it does make itself known to humans swimming in their waters.

In February 2020, a video posted on social media by marine biologist and shark scientist Riley Elliot, also known as 'The Shark Man', shows a large mako shark biting down on the outer rim of the boat in the middle of the ocean off the coast of New Zealand.

Elliot can be heard saying 'what are you doing, mate?' to the beast, prompting it to release its jaws before submerging itself beneath the surface.

He was doing research for his PhD with his fiancé and an underwater cinematographer when the shark struck.

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