'Insane' moment when giant humpback whale CRASHES onto 19-foot boat, nearly capsizing the vessel 

2 months ago
AMERICA NEWS NOW

Shocking video caught the moment a mammoth humpback whale breached onto a 19-foot motor boat in Plymouth Harbor, Massachusetts, smashing the vessel's skylight in the bow and leaving it bobbing like a cork in the water.

Three humpback whales, which grow an average size of 49 to 52 feet long and weigh up to 66,000 pounds, drew dozens of boaters to the waters near White Horse Beach in Plymouth over the weekend to watch them feed on bait fish called pogies, which school in the harbor.

About 10 a.m. on Sunday, the whales, which eat by opening their giant jaws and scooping up as many fish as they can, were 'surge feeding,' when they swim under their prey and scoop them up as they rise out of the water.

Shocking video caught the moment a mammoth humpback whale breached onto a 19-foot motor boat in Plymouth Harbor, Massachusetts, smashing the vessel's skylight in the bow and leaving it bobbing like a cork in the water. 

Footage shows a humpback whale rise up on a motorboat as it was surge feeding off White Horse Beach in Plymouth, Massachusetts

The mammoth fish rose 30 feet from the water before smashing down on the bow of the boat

The bow of the 19-foot vessel was completely submerged after the whale landed on it

Three humpback whales, which grow an average size of 49 to 52 feet long and weigh up to 66,000 pounds, drew dozens of boaters to the waters near White Horse Beach in Plymouth over the weekend to watch them feed on bait fish called pogies, which school in the harbor.

About 10 a.m. on Sunday, the whales, which eat by opening their giant jaws and scooping up as many fish as they can, were 'surge feeding,' when they swim under their prey and scoop them up as they rise out of the water.

 'It was insane,' Ryder Parkhurst, who saw the collision, told NBC Boston. 'The guy was just in the wrong place at the wrong time, that's all. Pops up, bang! Right on the bow of the guy's boat.'

'I just saw the boat go freaking flying, it was crazy,' Parkhurst told the station. 'It was nuts. I couldn't believe the thing was still floating.'

The humpback whale smash the skylight at the bow of the boat before sliding back into the water

The humpback whale was 'surge feeding' on baitfish called pogies which school in Plymouth Harbor

The boat was able to safely navigate back to the boat ramp and sustained only minor damage.

'It was just shocking,' said Justin Enggasser, whose son shot the footage from a kayak about 100 feet away. 'There was a lot of relief to see the boat pop back up because the bow really did submerge.' 

Aside from being shaken up, none of the passengers of the vessel were hurt.

'If someone was on the bow of that boat, this really could have been a tragic story,' Plymouth Harbormaster Chad Hunter told CBS News Boston

It's illegal to chase or harass whales under the Marine Mammals Act, and Hunter referred the video and all other information he collected at the scene to the Massachusetts Environmental Police, who are investigating.

'We tell boaters: If you see a spout, look out,' he told CBS. 

In a press statement, Hunter warned boaters that the whales could be hurt too.

'This interaction, while rare, is a reminder that these interactions can be dangerous for both boaters and whales,' Hunter said. 

Paddle boarder Bob Babcock caught humpback whale in the same Plymouth Harbor area brushing up against a fishing boat

Days before a humpback whale landed on a 19-foot fishing boat, the same type of whale brushed up against this motorboat

Paddle boarder Bob Babcock got so close to the feeding humpback that he photographed the barnacles around its mouth

The interactions may not be as rare as he says.

Days before the boat-busting breech, paddle boarder Bob Babcock recorded another close encounter between a motorboat and a whale.

As he was paddling out at dawn, the video shows the water beside a fishing boat begin to boil with rising fish and then a whale's back surfaces, lifting the ship slightly as both men on boat reach for the gunwales to steady themselves.

'Feeding whales are often distracted whales making it more important for boaters to be watching for them as the whales are very focused on fish at that point, not boats,' Regina Asmutis-Silva, the head of conservation group Whale and Dolphin Conservation, said.

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